Iso file for X86 systems ?

Suggestions for features and software you would like to see in DietPi, goes here.
Post Reply
perlian
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue May 17, 2016 12:13 pm
Location: Germany
Contact:

Iso file for X86 systems ?

Post by perlian »

i tried dietpi on vmware yesterday

it works great and of course much faster than on a raspberry

is it possible to offer an iso file to install dietpi on a real x86 pc or run from an usb stick ?
User avatar
Fourdee
Site Admin
Posts: 2788
Joined: Tue Feb 06, 2007 1:36 pm

Re: Iso file for X86 systems ?

Post by Fourdee »

perlian wrote:is it possible to offer an iso file to install dietpi on a real x86 pc or run from an usb stick ?
Hi perlian,

Not at the moment unfortunately. Although a good idea, DietPi isn't really designed to run on physical PC's, unless its self contained in a VM.

The only thing I can suggest is install VMware ESX/vSphere (http://www.vmware.com/uk/products/vsphere-hypervisor) on your Pc/server. This will turn you server into a "VMware dedicated player".
You can then run the DietPi VMware on the system, and, as many as you like. Performance should be very close to a physical install.
If you find our project or support useful, then we’d really appreciate it if you’d consider contributing to the project however you can.
Donating is the easiest – you can use PayPal or become a DietPi patron.
perlian
Posts: 33
Joined: Tue May 17, 2016 12:13 pm
Location: Germany
Contact:

Re: Iso file for X86 systems ?

Post by perlian »

thats a good idea generally..........

but unfortunately my server has not enough ram to do funny things like running virtual instances (2GB)

I thought the step from a virtual pc to a real pc should be not a big problem

Because both need to be installed first time
marcdraco
Posts: 48
Joined: Sat May 28, 2016 2:10 am

Re: Iso file for X86 systems ?

Post by marcdraco »

The problem is that the hardware is not consistent. There are an innumerable combinations of hardware to support. In a VM container, you're dealing with a specific and consistent set of hardware which is provided by an abstraction layer.

Really rather clever, but I don't think 2gb is particularly low on RAM - you can run a number of low-resource Linux distros in that. I don't know if anyone has a KVM on any of those, but I'm willing to bet there is one somewhere.
Post Reply