Newbie Linux user question

Hi guys, I’m relatively new to all this Linux stuff, but I was able to migrate many things from my old Windows 10 server (Plex, Tautulli, Transmission, etc.) and got other stuff to work (Pi-hole + Unbound, OpenSSH server with certificates, Samba, WireGuard, etc.), thanks to DietPi!

I noticed that the latest stable Linux kernel is v5.5.5, and DietPi is running on an older v4.19.0 kernel (for the record, I’m using the x86/AMD64 version of DietPi). Is there any technical reasons for this?

Hi,

many thanks for your message. Just to avoid a misunderstanding and for clarification. DietPi is not an own OS. DietPi is a set of scripts on top of a Debian base image. Next to that, DietPi is not and will not create own kernel versions. Depending on the device, DietPi is using different base images (Raspberry OS, Armbian, Meveric or plain Debian). In case of x86/amd64, DietPi is using plain Debian as source. And there the actual mainstream kernel version is 4.19.

https://packages.debian.org/en/buster/linux-image-amd64

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Debian_version_history#Debian_10_(Buster)

Anyway, there are already newer kernel versions available

  1. for normal BIOS systems linux-image-5.4.0-0.bpo.4-amd64-unsigned (5.4.19-1~bpo10+1)
  2. for UEFI systems with Secure Boot linux-image-5.4.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 (5.4.19-1~bpo10+1)

To get it installed, you would need to enable Debian buster-backports

nano /etc/apt/sources.list.d/backports.list

Add following and safe the file

deb http://deb.debian.org/debian buster-backports main

Now install the kernel (I will use kernel for BIOS systems as example)

apt update
apt -t buster-backports install linux-image-5.4.0-0.bpo.4-amd64-unsigned linux-headers-5.4.0-0.bpo.4-all-amd64
reboot

once done you should be on kernel 5.4

root@DietPiVM1:~# uname -a
Linux DietPiVM1 5.4.0-0.bpo.4-amd64 #1 SMP Debian 5.4.19-1~bpo10+1 (2020-03-09) x86_64 GNU/Linux
root@DietPiVM1:~#

If needed there are other kernel packages like 5.7

https://packages.debian.org/buster-backports/kernel/

All this would be on your own risk. No grantee that it is working on your system.