Make your own distribution

Hello,

I have a very old Toshiba Satellite Pro laptop (32 bit) I think it dates from around 2005. I did a basic Debian BookWorm install on it and then tried to convert that to DietPi using the provided " Make your own distribution" script. I thought that this might run quite well on such an old laptop but I have run into a problem. I am getting an error “CPU Architecture not supported” does DietPi not work on x86 Native PC’s?

Thanks,

ISquishWorms

We support 64bit only for native PC

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Thanks Joulinar I thought that was probably the case.

Shame though as I was looking forward running DietPi on this old laptop.

xubunutu can run on x86 software…and it’s a very light desktop

If dietpi can’t run on x86, there are quite a few nice distro’s that can
are you wanting to run a server or a desktop environment?

Specs of laptop?

2 Likes

Just found this…if DietPi wont work, which sucks because DietPi is INCREDIBLE

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Thank you WarHawk for the suggestion. The Laptop it is super old and was just sitting around not being used. I have also been looking at alternative light weight Linux distros a couple I came across were Peppermint Mini and Slax. I would rather stay with Debian as that is what DietPi is based on so I am familiar with it. I was planning on just getting DietPi to boot to the terminal and install one of the light weight desktops from the software list onto it and just load the desktop environment when ever I needed to use it.

You are right DietPi is my go to and only choice when it comes to Raspberry PI’s. I have three of them 3B, 3B+ and 4 using it. I wish I could justify getting a Pi 5 but I can’t really at the RSP as by the time the power supply and extras are added I might as well buy myself a N100 mini PC.

Damn Small Linux is good too (they just released a new larger updated version)…but I literally ran Xubuntu on a machine so old I thought it wouldn’t operate at all…and it did fairly well

I have used SLAX and it is very nice…but it’s modular and for me being slackware had a pretty stout learning curve.

What are the specs of that machine?