Writing to a remote directory (Fedora31)

I’m planning to run Frigate on a Pine A64 running DietPI 7.1.2 and this app writes images and clips to a storage location. As I only have an SD card on the Pine64 I would like write to a Fedora31 server sitting on the same network but this requires to make the remote directory available and I’m not sure how to do that.

Two questions:

  • What do I need to do to be able to access the remote directory from my Pine64


  • Do I need any tools other than what’s available by default on DietPI or Fedora?

Basically you have 2 options. You could setup a Samba or a NFS server on your Fedora31 system. On DietPi simply use drive manager to mount the share you have created.

Tried NFS and got an error.

Basically I’m running a surveillance camera system on DietPI that produces images and short clips of events. Given I only have a small SD card on the Pine64 I’m running DietPI on I want to setup an NFS share so that I can copy files from a directory I want to mount a Linux server directory on the DietPI and directly write to that remote directory. Question: Are any images/clips stored on the DietPI and “mirrored” to the server via NFS or are the files directly written to the remote location; i.e. NFS server?

I though I should be able to do this via NFS, right? I have setup the NFS server on the Linux server and want to setup the NFS client on DietPI via DietPI-Drive_Manager but get an error message. Note: 192.168.2.99 is the NFS server, 192.168.2.97 is the NFS client

 [FAILED] NFS mount failed with the following error output:
│
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: mount(2): Connection refused
│ mount.nfs: portmap query retrying: RPC: Unable to receive
│ mount.nfs: portmap query failed: RPC: Unable to receive - Success
│ mount.nfs: mount to NFS server '192.168.2.99:/' failed: RPC Error: Unable to
│ receive
│ mount.nfs: timeout set for Fri May  7 14:26:33 2021
│ mount.nfs: trying text-based options
│ 'port=2049,vers=4.2,addr=192.168.2.99,clientaddr=192.168.2.97'
│ mount.nfs: trying text-based options 'port=2049,addr=192.168.2.99'
│ mount.nfs: prog 100003, trying vers=3, prot=6
│ mount.nfs: prog 100003, trying vers=3, prot=17
│ mount.nfs: trying text-based options
│ 'port=2049,vers=4.2,addr=192.168.2.99,clientaddr=192.168.2.97'
│ mount.nfs: trying text-based options 'port=2049,addr=192.168.2.99'
│ mount.nfs: prog 100003, trying vers=3, prot=6

Any idea how to resolve this error?

Did you configure the NFS share to be exported on the server side?

If you mean updating /etc/exports then yes, I have done that

ok let’s check the available mounts on the Fedora31 server

showmount -e 192.168.2.99

This is what I get

root@DietPi:~#
root@DietPi:~# showmount -e 192.168.2.99
clnt_create: RPC: Unable to receive
root@DietPi:~#

just to be sure 192.168.2.99 is the IP of your Fedora31 server? because it did not seems to populate a NFS share.

You could use rpcinfo -p <Fedora31_IP> to check if the NFS server is reachable from DietPi side. Basically both commands should looks like this.

root@DietPi3:~# showmount -e 192.168.0.10
Export list for 192.168.0.10:
/volume1/NFS 192.168.0.0/24
root@DietPi3:~#



root@DietPi3:~# rpcinfo -p 192.168.0.10
   program vers proto   port  service
    100000    4   tcp    111  portmapper
    100000    3   tcp    111  portmapper
    100000    2   tcp    111  portmapper
    100000    4   udp    111  portmapper
    100000    3   udp    111  portmapper
    100000    2   udp    111  portmapper
    100005    1   udp    892  mountd
    100005    1   tcp    892  mountd
    100005    2   udp    892  mountd
    100005    2   tcp    892  mountd
    100005    3   udp    892  mountd
    100005    3   tcp    892  mountd
    100024    1   udp    662  status
    100024    1   tcp    662  status
    100003    2   tcp   2049  nfs
    100003    3   tcp   2049  nfs
    100003    4   tcp   2049  nfs
    100003    2   udp   2049  nfs
    100003    3   udp   2049  nfs
    100021    1   udp   4045  nlockmgr
    100021    3   udp   4045  nlockmgr
    100021    4   udp   4045  nlockmgr
    100021    1   tcp   4045  nlockmgr
    100021    3   tcp   4045  nlockmgr
    100021    4   tcp   4045  nlockmgr
root@DietPi3:~#

On my example 192.168.0.10 is the NFS server. If both commands did not return anything, you would need to check on NFS server side what’s wrong.

DietPi OS is definitely different to Raspberry Pi OS – but whether it is better or not will depend on how you’re using it. There are a lot of cool tools included, but running a system which isn’t as widely covered by support forums and articles may prove irksome if something goes wrong.

Of course on a Pine A64 we don’t use RPi OS as base image. This we do on ARMv6 SBC like RPi 1 and Zero.