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Advanced Networking

Overview

How do I run DietPi-Software and install optimised software items?

To install any of the DietPi optimised software items listed below run from the command line:

dietpi-software

Choose Browse Software and select one or more items. Finally select Install.
DietPi will do all the necessary steps to install and start these software items.

DietPi-Software menu screenshot

To see all the DietPi configurations options, review the DietPi Tools section.

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WiFi HotSpot

The WiFi HotSpot package turns your device into a wireless hotspot/access point. This allows other wireless devices to connect and share the internet connection.

DietPi WiFi hotspot WiFi

The requirements are:

  • 1x Ethernet connection
  • 1x Supported USB WiFi adapter or onboard WiFi. This may vary depending on device and available WiFi drivers/modules. However, common adapters (e.g.: Atheros) should be fine.

Use the following credentials to initially connect devices to your hotspot.

  • SSID = DietPi-HotSpot
  • Access Key = dietpihotspot

Once installed, you can change the WiFi HotSpot settings (SSID/Key/Channel) at any time:

  1. Run dietpi-config
  2. Navigate to Networking Options: Adapters, then select WiFi
  3. Whilst in this menu, it is highly recommended you set the Country Code to your country. Depending on your country regulations, this could allow for channels 12/13 and increased power output (range) for the hotspot

YouTube video tutorial (German language): Raspberry Hotspot: Internet Sperren umgehen mit eigenen WiFi Hotspot unter DietPi (für alle Geräte).

Tor HotSpot

The Tor HotSpot package turns your device into a WiFi HotSpot/Access Point with Tor routing. All WiFi HotSpot traffic for all connected WiFi devices will be routed through the Tor network.
This is perfect for users requiring anonymity and privacy.

It also Installs:

DietPi WiFi hotspot tor

The requirements are:

  • 1x Ethernet connection
  • 1x Supported USB WiFi adapter or onboard WiFi. This may vary depending on device and available WiFi drivers/modules. However, common adapters (e.g.: Atheros) should be fine.

These are identical to the WiFi HotSpot credentials.

To verify that the traffic is being routed through Tor you can check the following:
On the connected WiFi device, go to the following URL: https://check.torproject.org


Wikipedia: https://wikipedia.org/wiki/Tor_(anonymity_network)
YouTube video tutorial: DietPi Tor Hotspot Setup on Raspberry Pi 3 B Plus.

HAProxy

HAProxy, which stands for High Availability Proxy, is a popular open source software TCP/HTTP Load Balancer and proxy solution. Its most common use is to improve the performance and reliability of a server environment by distributing the workload across multiple servers (e.g. web, application, database).

It is best suited for high traffic web sites and powers quite a number of the world’s most visited ones: GitHub, Imgur, Instagram, and Twitter. It has become the de-facto standard open-source load balancer, and it is often deployed by default in cloud platforms.

HAProxy statistics web page

This software title is recommended ONLY for advanced users!

After installation, you need to manually modify the haproxy.cfg to best fit your network requirements. Check the configuration manual here.

systemctl stop haproxy
nano /etc/haproxy/haproxy.cfg
systemctl start haproxy    

The stats web interface is accessible via port 1338:

  • URL = http://<your.IP>:1338
  • Username = admin
  • Password = dietpi

This installation was made possible by Jerome Queneuder, who provided the methods for compiling and installation.

The simplest way to load balance network traffic to multiple servers is to use layer 4 (transport layer) load balancing. Load balancing this way will forward user traffic based on IP range and port.

Layer 4 load balancing pictogram

The user accesses the load balancer, which forwards the user’s request to the web-backend group of backend servers. Whichever backend server is selected will respond directly to the user’s request.

Help text extracted from the tutorial: An Introduction to HAProxy and Load Balancing Concepts

A high availability (HA) setup is an infrastructure without a single point of failure. It prevents a single server failure from being a downtime event by adding redundancy to every layer of your architecture. A load balancer facilitates redundancy for the backend layer (web/app servers), but for a true high availability setup, you need to have redundant load balancers as well.

Here is a diagram of a basic high availability setup: Animated high availability setup diagram

Help text extracted from the tutorial: An Introduction to HAProxy and Load Balancing Concepts


Website: http://www.haproxy.org
Official documentation: http://www.haproxy.org/#docs

frp

A fast reverse proxy, helping you to expose a local server behind a NAT or firewall to the Internet. It supports more protocols, naming a few: TCP, UDP, HTTP(S), and also P2P connect mode.

Aside from proxies, frp also has a few dashboards that you can use to monitor it.

  • Admin UI (Client): http://<your.IP>:7400
  • Dashboard (Server): http://<your.IP>:7500
    • User name: admin
    • Password: <yourGlobalSoftwarePassword> (default: dietpi)

Depending on whether you have installed as client, server, or both, there will be only the configuration files for that component.

  • Client: /etc/frp/frpc.ini
  • Server: /etc/frp/frps.ini

Note: You will need root access to edit these files. You can also edit the client configuration file using Admin UI.


Official documentation: https://github.com/fatedier/frp/blob/dev/README.md
Source code: fatedier/frp

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